Rarest Perfume Blend – Civet Oil

Will you agree if I say that the absence of something…Okay let’s not call it absence…but the scarcity of something…actually anything…food…water…or even the money in pocket instigates respect in us for that very scarce commodity…Agree?

My father often used to share with me this incident where he was just in his teens and he was travelling alone to buy something because his house was in the hills…he was pretty confident of the route…after all it was his birth place…he bought the thing and while returning back home…he lost track of his path…for 2 long hours he wandered about the place like a vagabond! His stomach gurgled and being the finicky and pampered boy he was…he didn’t use to eat anything but things only that he fancied but that very day…with hardly a cent or two in his pocket…he ate what one guy was selling at a stall…peas probably they were…and they did make him feel full…He tells me…since that very day he started to respect food…And ate happily whatever offered…

That was just a glimpse of a small realization…On this big earth…there are myriad things we don’t respect…And probably when nature will dump us in acute scarcity would be the day we’ll realize its worth…One such amazing gift of nature being…Civet Oil…

Civet oil is obtained from creatures called civets…African civet lives in savannahs and forests of South and central Africa…while Indian civet lives in -

  • Nepal
  • Bangladesh
  • Vietnam

The thing about them is that these animals produce odorous secretion with purpose of marking their territory…Diluted…after some time…the odour of civet secretion…which normally is strong and repulsive…becomes pleasant with animalistic-musk nuance…For the purpose of collecting this secretion…animals are kept in cages…Luckily…this scent is nowadays mainly synthetic…

Talking about perfumes…Then well…they can be divided into base…middle and top notes…with each “note” consisting of two to six ingredients…Generally speaking…the earthier…deep scents of the base notes act as fixatives…

Though pretty uncommon today…musk…civet…ambergris and castoreum once ruled the perfume industry as pheromone-rich ingredients that lighten and diffuse effect on the perfume blend…Many perfumers still use the oil from the civet…a cousin to the mongoose….And as a matter of fact…the animal is not killed during the collection process…

Doing a little sneak-peek in history…Civet oil has been used in the perfume industry for centuries and has been recorded as being imported from Africa by King Solomon in the tenth century B.C. Once refined…civet oil is prized for its odor and long lasting properties…Civet oil is also valued for its medicinal uses which include the reduction of perspiration…a cure for some skin disorders and claims of aphrodisiac powers…Although the development of sensitive chemical substitutes has decreased the value of civet oil…it is still a part of some East African and Oriental economies…

But I’d like to share one common mistake people make…You know…There are five species of banded palm civets and otter civets…all living in the forests of Southeast Asia…Perhaps best known is the banded palm civet…named for the dark brown markings on its coat…The general coat color ranges from pale yellow to grayish buff….The face is distinctly marked by several dark longitudinal stripes…The coloration of the body is broken by about five transverse bands stretching midway down the flank…The tail is dark on its lower half…with two broad dark rings at the base…Foraging at night on the ground and in trees…the banded palm civet searches for

  • Rats
  • Lizards
  • Frogs
  • Snails
  • Crabs
  • Earthworms
  • Ants

Okay I think I have informed you enough…Go through these reference links now…

  1. Civet Cat by Blue Planet
  2. Civets by About
  3. Civet Oil by Dope

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